A Wee Life Update

I’ve been ‘uhmm-ing and ahh-ing’ over writing this post for a long time now – whether or not to write it, to share it, or even just when would be right. But this week, I’ve been reminded of one of the big reasons I started a blog in the first place – which was to encourage honest conversations. If I ever thought I could help someone by writing and sharing my own story and journey, then I would do it – regardless of how hard it may be, or how much I may not want to. Over the last two years, I’ve definitely done that at various different points, when the time has felt right.

Not only has that reminder been timely, but also an encouragement. It can be so easy to hide in the background, and to shy away from the things that push us outside of our comfort zone. It’s easier to avoid, to deny, or to run away from the problems we’re facing … easier, until, that is, they catch up with us.

There are only so many times we can say a “I’m fine”, through somewhat gritted teeth, trying to plaster a smile on your face to make it seem genuine before someone will (or, I hope, should) call you out on it. There will come a point where it’s possible to hit rock bottom, or to feel like we’re helpless. And it’s at this point, that it’s more and more important to recognise that it’s okay, and you’re allowed to say, “no, I’m not okay.”

Re-Learning to Love Food

Sounds a bit strange huh? I mean, who doesn’t like food?

At least, that’s the response I often get, or what I’ve observed over the last few years, is that for a lot of people – their lives, and in particular, their days, can revolve around food. From one meal to the next, thinking about when they can next eat – there appears to be such a culture of food in our everyday lives. It’s either that – or there’s the latest craze that is filling all the food blogs, cookery books, and making news articles – and people just can’t wait to jump on the bandwagon.

Whatever your thoughts on food are, it is impossible to deny that it is incredibly influential.

Sink or Swim

Not only have we found ourselves in the second month of the year, but I’ve just finished Week One of Semester Two – that’s right – university is officially back in action.

Before starting university in September, I’d somewhat prepared myself for a few difficult weeks. I knew I was going into something completely new; stepping out of my comfort zones in all walks of life – and had done my best to prepare for it… It was hard – and I’m glad that in many ways, I never have to go through that again to the same extent.

But, maybe I lulled myself into a false sense of security. I spent my Christmas holidays looking forward to coming back; full of expectation of what Semester Two could bring…but maybe forgetting to acknowledge quite how hard it would be.

FOMO: On Missing Out

Today’s thoughts come from a place I never really thought I’d be in – on talking about FOMO. Now, before you think “Hannah, what on earth is ‘FOMO’ and what planet have you walked into at university?” – please bear with me; I’ll explain.

What even is ‘FOMO’?
For those who don’t know, ‘FOMO’ is, according to the Urban Dictionary (trust me, hard to find a reliable source): “a state of mental or emotional strain caused by the fear of missing out.”

In other words, it’s an acronym for ‘Fear of Missing Out’ – just people use it as a normal word. If you think back to the time of ‘YOLO’, which has now died down in its use (thank goodness for that!) – it’s a bit similar to that.

FOMO is something that often strikes in social settings; the need to be a part of something, or so often linked with peer pressure.

Expectations of Christmas

What immediately springs to mind when you hear the word “Christmas”?

I would imagine that the answers I’d get to this (if I were to conduct a survey) would vary, but I’d also imagine that many of them would fall within the same category. I’d expect answers to include ‘presents’, ‘music’, ‘food’, ‘drink’, ‘Santa’, ‘Jesus’ birth’ (I’d hope that would crop up), and probably also ‘family’. Many of these things are synonymous to a modern day Christmas; a time of indulgence, giving and receiving (coupled with over-spending), and a general sense of frivolity.

Yet; I get the sense that for many people, the answers that I’ve given just now don’t quite cover it all.

At the End of Semester One

I’m staggered with the reality that I’ve finished my first semester of university, marking halfway through my first year. The last fourteen weeks, or 102 days, have been an intense journey, a rollercoaster of emotions and experiences – and it wouldn’t be right to just settle into ‘home life’ without taking time to reflect on everything that has changed.

The last time I sat down and properly did that, I’d just about reached the end of my first month at university. In many ways, that feels like a very long time ago. But at the same time, I feel as if I’ve blinked, and the time has flown by.

‘When Enough is Enough’ | Mental Health Day 2018

Mental health is something that is personal, and affects every single person differently. But this isn’t just a conversation for those who struggle with mental health difficulties – instead, it’s something that each and every one of us should be aware about. Just like keeping our bodies well, it’s as important, if not MORE important, that we take care of our minds.

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